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Some Notes On Solo Training

Be Patient.

Measureable improvement takes a long time. Don’t vaccilate between training methodologies. Instead, commit to a program for at least one full season before making strategic changes.

Listen to your body—don’t risk injury. The best ability is availability. It’s better to miss a couple reps at the end of a workout than to pop a hamstring and miss weeks or even months.

Stay Humble.

You have a sample size of one. What works for you might not work for others. What others do might work better for you than your current program. Listen and learn from others without ego.

Set goals and hold yourself accountable to them.

Enjoy Yourself.

Don’t forget—this is supposed to be fun. Do what you love, even if it’s not the best way to do it.

Solo training is lonely—make friends. Surround yourself with people who, like you, are dedicated to the sport. Push them to get better, and they’ll do the same for you. Give back to the sport by officiating or coaching.

Keep Learning.

Every workout, every mesocycle, every year is a lesson. Don’t autopilot through your training program. Write down what works and what doesn’t. Review each training cycle. Learn from the best and others on similar paths.

Become a student of the sport. Seek out research, new and old. Read and watch what coaches have to say.

Measure Everything.

Track more than just workouts—write down your sleep (quantity and quality), body fat, resting heart rate, stress levels, weight, heart rate variability, mood, glucose levels, bedroom CO2 concentration, and anything else that might affect performance. Make sure your data is easily analyzable.

Videotape yourself frequently, both on the track and in the gym.

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