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Februrary 2021 Review

Februrary 2021 Review

Another month in quarantine. It looks like there’s light at the end of the tunnel, and earlier than I had previously thought! Despite everything, the US has been by far the most effective country at getting shots in arms. Here’s hoping that Fauci’s right when he says that the general public will start getting vaccinated by the end of April! On to the review:

Goal Tracking

  • 🟢 Get 1% faster. Training’s been going pretty well—I’ve set a couple PRs in training! I’m running a 100m and 200m time trial next week which should tell me a lot about where I am. The only danger I see on the horizon is injury—I’ve got a mild case of high hamstring tendinopathy what I’ll have to be careful to manage properly.
  • 🟢 50% less discretionary spending. Despite big spending for Valentine’s Day (hotel, dinner, gift), I still managed to come in well under the bar I set for myself here. My February discretionary spending was 70% lower than my average monthly spend in 2020 (but significantly higher than January).
  • 🔴One hour of solitary free time a day. Once again, I haven’t managed to make time for this during the week. I haven’t even been tracking this goal! In March, I’ll make sure to keep track of whether or not I do this every day in Roam.
  • 🟢 Twice-weekly live conversations with friends. 4/4 again in February! It’s been great to catch up with some people I haven’t talked to since before the pandemic.
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Programming Like a Pianist

Programming Like a Pianist

Tyler Cowen asks: “What is it you do to train that is comparable to a pianist practicing scales? If you don’t know the answer to that one, maybe you are doing something wrong or not doing enough.” I’m a software engineer, so let’s answer that question for software engineers!

First, we need to figure out why pianists practice scales in the first place.

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Midlife Crises

Midlife Crises

Why do people have midlife crises? The term itself was only coined in 1965—it appears to be a phenomenon of modern life. Here’s my unfounded hypothesis: midlife crises arise when a person’s self-concept of growth meets the cold water of reality. This model explains some stereotypical midlife-crisis behavior like switching careers and buying expensive things. It explains why quarter-life crises have become increasingly common. It even hints at which sets of people are more likely to experience crises.

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Boise

Boise

Emily and I spent last October in Boise, Idaho. Our first few nights were downtown at The Grove Hotel, then rented an Airbnb close to BSU for the rest of the month. Overall, I was pleasantly surprised with Boise’s liveliness, and I had a great time.

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